Crop Circle Information Centre moves to Wiltshire Museum in Devizes

Wiltshire Times: An intricate pattern in a field near Calne in August 2000 An intricate pattern in a field near Calne in August 2000

The Crop Circle Information Centre is to move into the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes for the peak summer season.

It was based at Woodborough Garden Centre in the Pewsey Vale last summer, when it was visited by at least 5,000 people, the majority of them from overseas, but it will be in the museum’s art gallery from mid-June to the end of August.

Museum director David Dawson said: “Having the CCIC here is a natural progression in our interest in the Wiltshire landscape.”

The crop circle pass scheme, introduced in Wiltshire last year, is to be repeated, but the charge has been simplified.

There were three types of passes at different prices – per day, week or month – and organiser Monique Klinkenbergh said it was confusing for visitors, so this year the pass will cost £10 for the entire crop circle season.

Ms Klinkenbergh, who has been studying crop circles since 2006 and spends her summers in Clench Common near Marlborough to investigate them, said the pass scheme had been received well generally.

Four farmers – David Hughes of Beckhampton, James and Jill Hussey of Hackpen, Jeremy Leonard of Netherstreet and John Hayward from Titcombe – signed up to the scheme to allow people who bought a pass access to their land which had crop circles. Each farmer received a payment to reimburse them.

She said: “People interested in visiting crop circles felt more comfortable with a pass. For 20 years it has been chaos. People didn’t know if they were welcome on farmers’ land.

"With the pass system people really valued the feeling they could explore knowing they were not doing an illegal thing.”

Last year 206 passes were sold and payments to farmers totalled £2,250 plus a donation of £500 to the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution.

Additional donations made by the public amounted to just under £5,000 and this has been carried over into the Wiltshire Farmers Crop Circle Fund.

The crop circle passes will be available to buy online from mid-May at www.cropcircleaccess.com and there is a free App at cropcircleaccess.

Passes can also be bought at Stick & Stones Cafe at Woodborough Garden Centre, and Faux Art in The Parade, Marlborough.

Normal admission charges to the museum will apply for those who wish to visit the CCIC.

Last year was one of the sparsest for the number of crop circle formations.

In Wiltshire, there were 33 circles and just three others elsewhere in the UK.

This was the lowest in Wiltshire since 2006’s 22 reports.

In 2012, there were 54 crop circles in Wiltshire and 19 in the rest of the UK. The year with the most recorded crop circles in Wiltshire was 2000, with 79 instances.

It is thought extreme cold and wet spring in the UK delaying crops was a factor last year, when the first formation was on June 2. The first this year was on April 16, near Wootton Rivers.

Comments (7)

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8:11pm Fri 9 May 14

mhudston says...

Crop circles are nothing more than Vandalism of farmers crops, but criminals. So why is the G&H and the museum promoting this as some thing good?
Crop circles are nothing more than Vandalism of farmers crops, but criminals. So why is the G&H and the museum promoting this as some thing good? mhudston
  • Score: 0

11:19am Sat 10 May 14

By the sea says...

Any evidence for this wide sweeping statement would be welcome by all..
Any evidence for this wide sweeping statement would be welcome by all.. By the sea
  • Score: -1

4:31pm Sat 10 May 14

Mrs Donnyfly says...

By the sea wrote:
Any evidence for this wide sweeping statement would be welcome by all..
It's not a wide, sweeping statement at all. In fact the only evidence available is that they are man-made. So unless it's the farmers themselves doing it, the only other reasonable alternative is that they are being done by people encroaching the land and damaging what isn't theirs... i.e. vandalism.
[quote][p][bold]By the sea[/bold] wrote: Any evidence for this wide sweeping statement would be welcome by all..[/p][/quote]It's not a wide, sweeping statement at all. In fact the only evidence available is that they are man-made. So unless it's the farmers themselves doing it, the only other reasonable alternative is that they are being done by people encroaching the land and damaging what isn't theirs... i.e. vandalism. Mrs Donnyfly
  • Score: 0

9:13pm Sat 10 May 14

Suzanne Taylor says...

Everyone is entitled to opinions, but not to distortion of facts. It's a phenomenon that has been around for many years and there's no way anyone could know all circles were done by people. And, there is "evidence" to support it not being people, from failures of electro-magnetic equipment, to braided crop, to scientific experiments that were carried out. There’s enough war in the world with lives at stake, and we don’t need more of same in crop circle conversations. For some encouragement for debunkers to back off, see this little 10-minute clip: CROP CIRCLES REAL AND FAKE http://tinyurl.com/m
watxzt.
Everyone is entitled to opinions, but not to distortion of facts. It's a phenomenon that has been around for many years and there's no way anyone could know all circles were done by people. And, there is "evidence" to support it not being people, from failures of electro-magnetic equipment, to braided crop, to scientific experiments that were carried out. There’s enough war in the world with lives at stake, and we don’t need more of same in crop circle conversations. For some encouragement for debunkers to back off, see this little 10-minute clip: CROP CIRCLES REAL AND FAKE http://tinyurl.com/m watxzt. Suzanne Taylor
  • Score: -12

10:07pm Sat 10 May 14

Paul Tucker says...

The farmers seem to be happy with their compensation and I understand that crops can recover from this vandalism. As it also brings a lot of gullible tourists into the area who presumably spend a bit of money then promoting it seems OK to me.
Having said that, anyone who believes the ornate patterns that people come to see are anything but man-made is plain cuckoo.
The farmers seem to be happy with their compensation and I understand that crops can recover from this vandalism. As it also brings a lot of gullible tourists into the area who presumably spend a bit of money then promoting it seems OK to me. Having said that, anyone who believes the ornate patterns that people come to see are anything but man-made is plain cuckoo. Paul Tucker
  • Score: 4

12:45pm Sun 11 May 14

Grumpyoldgit99 says...

I do hope my Council Tax is not contributing to the idea that crop circles are anything other than produced by students after a good session in the local pub.
I do hope my Council Tax is not contributing to the idea that crop circles are anything other than produced by students after a good session in the local pub. Grumpyoldgit99
  • Score: 9

4:50pm Thu 15 May 14

politepanda says...

Suzanne Taylor - crop circles - a phenomenon? No - a man-made pattern in someone else's crops.
"There’s enough war in the world with lives at stake, and we don’t need more of same in crop circle conversations." - What? Good grief.
I'm not a debunker - really I'm not. But I don't believe in santa or the sasquatch, either.
And I have the right to say so. Without putting anyone's life at stake.
Suzanne Taylor - crop circles - a phenomenon? No - a man-made pattern in someone else's crops. "There’s enough war in the world with lives at stake, and we don’t need more of same in crop circle conversations." - What? Good grief. I'm not a debunker - really I'm not. But I don't believe in santa or the sasquatch, either. And I have the right to say so. Without putting anyone's life at stake. politepanda
  • Score: 2

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