Melksham young chefs all rise to occasion

Wiltshire Times: Winners of the masterchef contest Leah Webb and Melissa Gould, centre, from Forest and Sandridge Primary School, with runners up Ella Miles and Elle Snell from Manor Primary School and Callum McMillan and Oliver Spooner from Bowerhill Primary Winners of the masterchef contest Leah Webb and Melissa Gould, centre, from Forest and Sandridge Primary School, with runners up Ella Miles and Elle Snell from Manor Primary School and Callum McMillan and Oliver Spooner from Bowerhill Primary

Pineapple upside-down cake was on the menu for the mayor of Melksham last week, as she judged some of the town’s best young chefs.

Forty-two Year 6 students from five local primary schools gathered at Melksham Oak School last Wednesday for its Super Chef contest, and worked in teams to prepare a balanced two-course meal for two on a budget of £5.

Melissa Gould and Leah Webb, of Forest and Sandridge Primary School, secured first prize after wowing the judges, who also included Melksham Oak headteacher Stephen Clark, ASDA people service manager Alex Frith and Tisbury-based chef Pravin Nayar.

Cllr Welch said: “The quality of food and the thought that had gone into the menu, preparation and layout was amazing.

“The winners’ pineapple upside down cake was to die for, and a very worthy winner.”

The winners were presented with £20 worth of ASDA vouchers and a trophy designed by school’s design technology technician William Grainger.

The contest was organised by design technology teacher Stacey Scarff. She said: “They were really focused and excited about what they were doing.

“The level of skill was really high, which was lovely to see.

“They were limited for what they could do, but we had pasta and couscous, and one team made homemade pastry and another did a meringue.”

The annual contest is one of the regular activities at the school to engage with local primary pupils.

Miss Scarff said: “This is the third year we’ve done it, and it’s been the best one yet.

“The Year 6s are up quite a lot, and we go into the schools and do a lot of work on the transition so they feel safe, comfortable and confident about where they are and what they are doing here.”

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