Wiltshire College gets ahead in hat-wearing record bid

Wiltshire Times: Wiltshire College principal Di Dale in her hat Wiltshire College principal Di Dale in her hat

More than 1,500 staff and students from Wiltshire College joined an attempt on the Guinness World Record for the most people wearing recyclable hats simultaneously across multiple locations.

The challenge took place across 10 sites, including the college’s four main campuses in Trowbridge, Chippenham, Salisbury and Lackham.

The world record bid was made to raise awareness of a variety of life issues, including the environment and sustainability, as well as making it into the record books.

Wiltshire College principal and chief executive Di Dale, who was at the Lackham Campus, wore a lily pad hat made for her by level three art and design students Cheralynne Rendell and Emma Downs, based at Chippenham.

Ms Dale said: “I was delighted with my hat and feel the students have all been absolutely brilliant during the whole record attempt, from coming up with this novel idea to helping us to reduce our consumption of paper and supporting recycling within the college.

“Today was without any doubt a true college-wide team effort, of which we can be proud.

“We also really appreciate the support that members of the public, schools, representatives from local organisations and five mayors and deputy mayors across the county have given us.”

Recycling is a part of the college’s commitment to sustainability and the event supported its commitment to the Reduce, Reuse and Recycle ethos.

The world record attempt saw students, staff and members of the public wearing hats under controlled conditions for six minutes.

All the hats were made from recyclable paper and included a range of creative designs, from berets and top hats to crowns, bonnets and even a khepresh, an ancient Eygptian royal headdress.

The current record for the most people wearing paper hats simultaneously is 972, which was achieved last year in Japan by Aisin AW Co Ltd.

However, the staff and students will have to wait before they find out if they have officially broken the Guinness World Record, as the result could take up to six weeks to be confirmed.

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